Tired Head or Beat?

Reflection is a part of teaching. As the new calendar year begins, I find myself rethinking, reworking, and reorganizing for my students. In response to Margaret Regan’s Edutopia posting Six Steps to Master Teaching: Becoming a Reflective Practitioner, I am dedicating the next several blog entries to these six steps.

Step#3 – Pool both Patience and Perseverance

A family friend who is a few years older than I am, graduated high school, then college and started her teaching career. I was so excited for her! She was completing the dream I wanted for myself. I envisioned the way my friend would decorate her classroom, align her desks, design her policies and procedures, and define her classroom rules and expectations.

To my surprise she quit after her first year of teaching. I could not understand how anyone could quit something that was engrained in her as a calling.

We played golf every morning in New Mexico.

The statistics are outstanding! Ten percent of teachers quit after their first year. Many articles have been written on why this might occur – salary, student behavior, work load, etc. When it comes down to keeping our teachers, we must share with them that it is acceptable to take time for themselves. Teachers need to use their weekends to re-energize/revitalize themselves. We cannot let each other get stuck in the ruts of the job.

When my husband and I leave for the day (He teaches at the junior high, and we commute.), one of use asks, “Are you tired head or beat?” which means, “Are you mentally exhausted, or are you physically exhausted?” Usually, on Fridays I am both!

I am and will always be a teacher. It is not my job but my calling in life. Because it is my calling, it is my duty to make sure I am at 100% when I go back on Monday morning. Neither I nor my students can afford to lose any instructional time. It is imperative I find ways to recharge mentally and physically.

This weekend I treated myself to a manicure/pedicure with my mother. That is two hours of serene pampering for me from me!  But there are many other things we can do for ourselves.

Other activities that bring a revitalizing energy to my inner teacher are: playing golf, sparring, boxing, writing, reading, browsing the book store, shopping, watching movies, and/or meeting friends for dinner.

Other ways I recharge mentally: participate in a Professional Learning Network  like #edchat #engchat on Twitter (there are many others!); read inspirational books, blogs, articles; listen to music; take a class (scrapbooking, photography, Zumba, jewelry-making, etc).

For the first 12 years of my teaching career, I taught summer school. The last two years I declined teaching summer school because I now need the summers to find my inner peace and re-energize the teacher in me. Instead of summer school, I have kept my nephew Will and my godson JD. Being able to spend time with them (and at the pool, soaking in vitamin D), has given me a new appreciation for “me time.”

How do you re-energize/revitalize your inner teacher?

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Filed under Master Teaching, Reflection

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